Archive for the ‘Monitoring’ Category.

HTTP Status Code Definitions

Each Status-Code is described below, including a description of which method(s) it can follow and any metainformation required in the response.

Informational HTTP 1xx

This class of status code indicates a provisional response, consisting only of the Status-Line and optional headers, and is terminated by an empty line. There are no required headers for this class of status code. Since HTTP/1.0 did not define any 1xx status codes, servers MUST NOT send a 1xx response to an HTTP/1.0 client except under experimental conditions.
A client MUST be prepared to accept one or more 1xx status responses prior to a regular response, even if the client does not expect a 100 (Continue) status message. Unexpected 1xx status responses MAY be ignored by a user agent.
Proxies MUST forward 1xx responses, unless the connection between the proxy and its client has been closed, or unless the proxy itself requested the generation of the 1xx response. (For example, if a proxy adds an "Expect: 100-continue" field when it forwards a request, then it need not forward the corresponding 100 (Continue) response(s).)

HTTP 100 Continue

The client SHOULD continue with its request. This interim response is used to inform the client that the initial part of the request has been received and has not yet been rejected by the server. The client SHOULD continue by sending the remainder of the request or, if the request has already been completed, ignore this response. The server MUST send a final response after the request has been completed.

HTTP 101 Switching Protocols

The server understands and is willing to comply with the client’s request, via the Upgrade message header field, for a change in the application protocol being used on this connection. The server will switch protocols to those defined by the response’s Upgrade header field immediately after the empty line which terminates the 101 response.
The protocol SHOULD be switched only when it is advantageous to do so. For example, switching to a newer version of HTTP is advantageous over older versions, and switching to a real-time, synchronous protocol might be advantageous when delivering resources that use such features.

Successful HTTP 2xx

This class of status code indicates that the client’s request was successfully received, understood and accepted.

HTTP 200 OK

The request has succeeded. The information returned with the response is dependent on the method used in the request, for example:
GET an entity corresponding to the requested resource is sent in the response;
HEAD the entity-header fields corresponding to the requested resource are sent in the response without any message-body;
POST an entity describing or containing the result of the action;
TRACE an entity containing the request message as received by the end server.

HTTP 201 Created

The request has been fulfilled and resulted in a new resource being created. The newly created resource can be referenced by the URI(s) returned in the entity of the response, with the most specific URI for the resource given by a Location header field. The response SHOULD include an entity containing a list of resource characteristics and location(s) from which the user or user agent can choose the one most appropriate. The entity format is specified by the media type given in the Content-Type header field. The origin server MUST create the resource before returning the 201 status code. If the action cannot be carried out immediately, the server SHOULD respond with 202 (Accepted) response instead.
A 201 response MAY contain an ETag response header field indicating the current value of the entity tag for the requested variant just created.

HTTP 202 Accepted

The request has been accepted for processing, but the processing has not been completed. The request might or might not eventually be acted upon, as it might be disallowed when processing actually takes place. There is no facility for re-sending a status code from an asynchronous operation such as this.
The 202 response is intentionally non-committal. Its purpose is to allow a server to accept a request for some other process (perhaps a batch-oriented process that is only run once per day) without requiring that the user agent’s connection to the server persist until the process is completed. The entity returned with this response SHOULD include an indication of the request’s current status and either a pointer to a status monitor or some estimate of when the user can expect the request to be fulfilled.

HTTP 203 Non-Authoritative Information

The returned metainformation in the entity-header is not the definitive set as available from the origin server, but is gathered from a local or a third-party copy. The set presented MAY be a subset or superset of the original version. For example, including local annotation information about the resource might result in a superset of the metainformation known by the origin server. Use of this response code is not required and is only appropriate when the response would otherwise be 200 (OK).

HTTP 204 No Content

The server has fulfilled the request but does not need to return an entity-body, and might want to return updated metainformation. The response MAY include new or updated metainformation in the form of entity-headers, which if present SHOULD be associated with the requested variant.
If the client is a user agent, it SHOULD NOT change its document view from that which caused the request to be sent. This response is primarily intended to allow input for actions to take place without causing a change to the user agent’s active document view, although any new or updated metainformation SHOULD be applied to the document currently in the user agent’s active view.
The 204 response MUST NOT include a message-body, and thus is always terminated by the first empty line after the header fields.

HTTP 205 Reset Content

The server has fulfilled the request and the user agent SHOULD reset the document view which caused the request to be sent. This response is primarily intended to allow input for actions to take place via user input, followed by a clearing of the form in which the input is given so that the user can easily initiate another input action. The response MUST NOT include an entity.

HTTP 206 Partial Content

The server has fulfilled the partial GET request for the resource. The request MUST have included a Range header field indicating the desired range, and MAY have included an If-Range header field to make the request conditional.
The response MUST include the following header fields:

  • Either a Content-Range header field indicating the range included with this response, or a multipart/byteranges, Content-Type including Content-Range fields for each part. If a Content-Length header field is present in the response, its value MUST match the actual number of OCTETs transmitted in the message-body.
  • Date
  • ETag and/or Content-Location, if the header would have been sent in a 200 response to the same request
  • Expires, Cache-Control, and/or Vary, if the field-value might differ from that sent in any previous response for the same variant

If the 206 response is the result of an If-Range request that used a strong cache validator, the response SHOULD NOT include other entity-headers. If the response is the result of an If-Range request that used a weak validator, the response MUST NOT include other entity-headers; this prevents inconsistencies between cached entity-bodies and updated headers. Otherwise, the response MUST include all of the entity-headers that would have been returned with a 200 (OK) response to the same request.
A cache MUST NOT combine a 206 response with other previously cached content if the ETag or Last-Modified headers do not match exactly.
A cache that does not support the Range and Content-Range headers MUST NOT cache 206 (Partial) responses.

Redirection HTTP 3xx

This class of status code indicates that further action needs to be taken by the user agent in order to fulfil the request. The action required MAY be carried out by the user agent without interaction with the user if and only if the method used in the second request is GET or HEAD. A client SHOULD detect infinite redirection loops, since such loops generate network traffic for each redirection.
Note: previous versions of this specification recommended a maximum of five redirections. Content developers should be aware that there might be clients that implement such a fixed limitation.

HTTP 300 Multiple Choices

The requested resource corresponds to any one of a set of representations, each with its own specific location and agent- driven negotiation information is being provided so that the user (or user agent) can select a preferred representation and redirect its request to that location.
Unless it was a HEAD request, the response SHOULD include an entity containing a list of resource characteristics and location(s) from which the user or user agent can choose the one most appropriate. The entity format is specified by the media type given in the Content- Type header field. Depending upon the format and the capabilities of the user agent, selection of the most appropriate choice MAY be performed automatically. However, this specification does not define any standard for such automatic selection.
If the server has a preferred choice of representation, it SHOULD include the specific URI for that representation in the Location field; user agents MAY use the Location field value for automatic redirection. This response is cacheable unless indicated otherwise.

HTTP 301 Moved Permanently

The requested resource has been assigned a new permanent URI and any future references to this resource SHOULD use one of the returned URIs. Clients with link editing capabilities ought to automatically re-link references to the Request-URI to one or more of the new references returned by the server, where possible. This response is cacheable unless indicated otherwise.
The new permanent URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).
If the 301 status code is received in response to a request other than GET or HEAD, the user agent MUST NOT automatically redirect the request unless it can be confirmed by the user, since this might change the conditions under which the request was issued.
Note: When automatically redirecting a POST request after receiving a 301 status code, some existing HTTP/1.0 user agents will erroneously change it into a GET request.

HTTP 302 Found

The requested resource resides temporarily under a different URI. Since the redirection might be altered on occasion, the client SHOULD continue to use the Request-URI for future requests. This response is only cacheable if indicated by a Cache-Control or Expires header field.
The temporary URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).
If the 302 status code is received in response to a request other than GET or HEAD, the user agent MUST NOT automatically redirect the request unless it can be confirmed by the user, since this might change the conditions under which the request was issued.
Note: RFC 1945 and RFC 2068 specify that the client is not allowed to change the method on the redirected request.  However, most existing user agent implementations treat 302 as if it were a 303 response, performing a GET on the Location field-value regardless of the original request method. The status codes 303 and 307 have been added for servers that wish to make unambiguously clear which kind of reaction is expected of the client.

HTTP 303 See Other

The response to the request can be found under a different URI and SHOULD be retrieved using a GET method on that resource. This method exists primarily to allow the output of a POST-activated script to redirect the user agent to a selected resource. The new URI is not a substitute reference for the originally requested resource. The 303 response MUST NOT be cached, but the response to the second (redirected) request might be cacheable.
The different URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s).
Note: Many pre-HTTP/1.1 user agents do not understand the 303 status. When interoperability with such clients is a concern, the 302 status code may be used instead, since most user agents react to a 302 response as described here for 303.

HTTP 304 Not Modified

If the client has performed a conditional GET request and access is allowed, but the document has not been modified, the server SHOULD respond with this status code. The 304 response MUST NOT contain a message-body, and thus is always terminated by the first empty line after the header fields.
The response MUST include the following header fields:

  • Date, unless its omission is required

If a clockless origin server obeys these rules, and proxies and clients add their own Date to any response received without one, caches will operate correctly.

  • ETag and/or Content-Location, if the header would have been sent in a 200 response to the same request
  • Expires, Cache-Control, and/or Vary, if the field-value might differ from that sent in any previous response for the same variant

If the conditional GET used a strong cache validator, the response SHOULD NOT include other entity-headers. Otherwise (i.e., the conditional GET used a weak validator), the response MUST NOT include other entity-headers; this prevents inconsistencies between cached entity-bodies and updated headers.
If a 304 response indicates an entity not currently cached, then the cache MUST disregard the response and repeat the request without the conditional.
If a cache uses a received 304 response to update a cache entry, the cache MUST update the entry to reflect any new field values given in the response.

HTTP 305 Use Proxy

The requested resource MUST be accessed through the proxy given by the Location field. The Location field gives the URI of the proxy. The recipient is expected to repeat this single request via the proxy. 305 responses MUST only be generated by origin servers.
Note: RFC 2068 was not clear that 305 was intended to redirect a single request, and to be generated by origin servers only.  Not observing these limitations has significant security consequences.

HTTP 306 (Unused)

The 306 status code was used in a previous version of the specification, is no longer used, and the code is reserved.

HTTP 307 Temporary Redirect

The requested resource resides temporarily under a different URI. Since the redirection MAY be altered on occasion, the client SHOULD continue to use the Request-URI for future requests. This response is only cacheable if indicated by a Cache-Control or Expires header field.
The temporary URI SHOULD be given by the Location field in the response. Unless the request method was HEAD, the entity of the response SHOULD contain a short hypertext note with a hyperlink to the new URI(s), since many pre-HTTP/1.1 user agents do not understand the 307 status. Therefore, the note SHOULD contain the information necessary for a user to repeat the original request on the new URI.
If the 307 status code is received in response to a request other than GET or HEAD, the user agent MUST NOT automatically redirect the request unless it can be confirmed by the user, since this might change the conditions under which the request was issued.

Client Error HTTP 4xx

The 4xx class of status code is intended for cases in which the client seems to have erred. Except when responding to a HEAD request, the server SHOULD include an entity containing an explanation of the error situation, and whether it is a temporary or permanent condition. These status codes are applicable to any request method. User agents SHOULD display any included entity to the user.
If the client is sending data, a server implementation using TCP SHOULD be careful to ensure that the client acknowledges receipt of the packet(s) containing the response, before the server closes the input connection. If the client continues sending data to the server after the close, the server’s TCP stack will send a reset packet to the client, which may erase the client’s unacknowledged input buffers before they can be read and interpreted by the HTTP application.

HTTP 400 Bad Request

The request could not be understood by the server due to malformed syntax. The client SHOULD NOT repeat the request without modifications.

HTTP 401 Unauthorized

The request requires user authentication. The response MUST include a WWW-Authenticate header field containing a challenge applicable to the requested resource. The client MAY repeat the request with a suitable Authorization header field. If the request already included Authorization credentials, then the 401 response indicates that authorization has been refused for those credentials. If the 401 response contains the same challenge as the prior response, and the user agent has already attempted authentication at least once, then the user SHOULD be presented the entity that was given in the response, since that entity might include relevant diagnostic information. HTTP access authentication is explained in "HTTP Authentication: Basic and Digest Access Authentication".

HTTP 402 Payment Required

This code is reserved for future use.

HTTP 403 Forbidden

The server understood the request, but is refusing to fulfil it. Authorization will not help and the request SHOULD NOT be repeated. If the request method was not HEAD and the server wishes to make public why the request has not been fulfilled, it SHOULD describe the reason for the refusal in the entity. If the server does not wish to make this information available to the client, the status code 404 (Not Found) can be used instead.

HTTP 404 Not Found

The server has not found anything matching the Request-URI. No indication is given of whether the condition is temporary or permanent. The 410 (Gone) status code SHOULD be used if the server knows, through some internally configurable mechanism, that an old resource is permanently unavailable and has no forwarding address. This status code is commonly used when the server does not wish to reveal exactly why the request has been refused, or when no other response is applicable.

HTTP 405 Method Not Allowed

The method specified in the Request-Line is not allowed for the resource identified by the Request-URI. The response MUST include an Allow header containing a list of valid methods for the requested resource.

HTTP 406 Not Acceptable

The resource identified by the request is only capable of generating response entities which have content characteristics not acceptable according to the accept headers sent in the request.
Unless it was a HEAD request, the response SHOULD include an entity containing a list of available entity characteristics and location(s) from which the user or user agent can choose the one most appropriate. The entity format is specified by the media type given in the Content-Type header field. Depending upon the format and the capabilities of the user agent, selection of the most appropriate choice MAY be performed automatically. However, this specification does not define any standard for such automatic selection.
Note: HTTP/1.1 servers are allowed to return responses which are not acceptable according to the accept headers sent in the request. In some cases, this may even be preferable to sending a 406 response. User agents are encouraged to inspect the headers of an incoming response to determine if it is acceptable.
If the response could be unacceptable, a user agent SHOULD temporarily stop receipt of more data and query the user for a decision on further actions.

HTTP 407 Proxy Authentication Required

This code is similar to 401 (Unauthorized), but indicates that the client must first authenticate itself with the proxy. The proxy MUST return a Proxy-Authenticate header field containing a challenge applicable to the proxy for the requested resource. The client MAY repeat the request with a suitable Proxy-Authorization header field. HTTP access authentication is explained in "HTTP Authentication: Basic and Digest Access Authentication".

HTTP 408 Request Timeout

The client did not produce a request within the time that the server was prepared to wait. The client MAY repeat the request without modifications at any later time.

HTTP 409 Conflict

The request could not be completed due to a conflict with the current state of the resource. This code is only allowed in situations where it is expected that the user might be able to resolve the conflict and resubmit the request. The response body SHOULD include enough information for the user to recognize the source of the conflict. Ideally, the response entity would include enough information for the user or user agent to fix the problem; however, that might not be possible and is not required.
Conflicts are most likely to occur in response to a PUT request. For example, if versioning were being used and the entity being PUT included changes to a resource which conflict with those made by an earlier (third-party) request, the server might use the 409 response to indicate that it can’t complete the request. In this case, the response entity would likely contain a list of the differences between the two versions in a format defined by the response Content-Type.

HTTP 410 Gone

The requested resource is no longer available at the server and no forwarding address is known. This condition is expected to be considered permanent. Clients with link editing capabilities SHOULD delete references to the Request-URI after user approval. If the server does not know, or has no facility to determine, whether or not the condition is permanent, the status code 404 (Not Found) SHOULD be used instead. This response is cacheable unless indicated otherwise.
The 410 response is primarily intended to assist the task of web maintenance by notifying the recipient that the resource is intentionally unavailable and that the server owners desire that remote links to that resource be removed. Such an event is common for limited-time, promotional services and for resources belonging to individuals no longer working at the server’s site. It is not necessary to mark all permanently unavailable resources as "gone" or to keep the mark for any length of time — that is left to the discretion of the server owner.

HTTP 411 Length Required

The server refuses to accept the request without a defined Content- Length. The client MAY repeat the request if it adds a valid Content-Length header field containing the length of the message-body in the request message.

HTTP Precondition Failed

The precondition given in one or more of the request-header fields evaluated to false when it was tested on the server. This response code allows the client to place preconditions on the current resource metainformation (header field data) and thus prevent the requested method from being applied to a resource other than the one intended.

HTTP 413 Request Entity Too Large

The server is refusing to process a request because the request entity is larger than the server is willing or able to process. The server MAY close the connection to prevent the client from continuing the request.
If the condition is temporary, the server SHOULD include a Retry- After header field to indicate that it is temporary and after what time the client MAY try again.

HTTP 414 Request-URI Too Long

The server is refusing to service the request because the Request-URI is longer than the server is willing to interpret. This rare condition is only likely to occur when a client has improperly converted a POST request to a GET request with long query information, when the client has descended into a URI "black hole" of redirection (e.g., a redirected URI prefix that points to a suffix of itself), or when the server is under attack by a client attempting to exploit security holes present in some servers using fixed-length buffers for reading or manipulating the Request-URI.

HTTP 415 Unsupported Media Type

The server is refusing to service the request because the entity of the request is in a format not supported by the requested resource for the requested method.

HTTP 416 Requested Range Not Satisfiable

A server SHOULD return a response with this status code if a request included a Range request-header field, and none of the range-specifier values in this field overlap the current extent of the selected resource, and the request did not include an If-Range request-header field. (For byte-ranges, this means that the first- byte-pos of all of the byte-range-spec values were greater than the current length of the selected resource.)
When this status code is returned for a byte-range request, the response SHOULD include a Content-Range entity-header field specifying the current length of the selected resource. This response MUST NOT use the multipart/byteranges content- type.

HTTP 417 Expectation Failed

The expectation given in an Expect request-header field could not be met by this server, or, if the server is a proxy, the server has unambiguous evidence that the request could not be met by the next-hop server.

Server Error HTTP 5xx

Response status codes beginning with the digit "5" indicate cases in which the server is aware that it has erred or is incapable of performing the request. Except when responding to a HEAD request, the server SHOULD include an entity containing an explanation of the error situation, and whether it is a temporary or permanent condition. User agents SHOULD display any included entity to the user. These response codes are applicable to any request method.

HTTP 500 Internal Server Error

The server encountered an unexpected condition which prevented it from fulfilling the request.

HTTP 501 Not Implemented

The server does not support the functionality required to fulfil the request. This is the appropriate response when the server does not recognize the request method and is not capable of supporting it for any resource.

HTTP 502 Bad Gateway

The server, while acting as a gateway or proxy, received an invalid response from the upstream server it accessed in attempting to fulfil the request.

HTTP 503 Service Unavailable

The server is currently unable to handle the request due to a temporary overloading or maintenance of the server. The implication is that this is a temporary condition which will be alleviated after some delay. If known, the length of the delay MAY be indicated in a Retry-After header. If no Retry-After is given, the client SHOULD handle the response as it would for a 500 response.
Note: The existence of the 503 status code does not imply that a server must use it when becoming overloaded. Some servers may wish to simply refuse the connection.

HTTP 504 Gateway Timeout

The server, while acting as a gateway or proxy, did not receive a timely response from the upstream server specified by the URI (e.g. HTTP, FTP, LDAP) or some other auxiliary server (e.g. DNS) it needed to access in attempting to complete the request.
Note: Note to implementors: some deployed proxies are known to return 400 or 500 when DNS lookups time out.

HTTP 505 HTTP Version Not Supported

The server does not support, or refuses to support, the HTTP protocol version that was used in the request message. The server is indicating that it is unable or unwilling to complete the request using the same major version as the client, other than with this error message. The response SHOULD contain an entity describing why that version is not supported and what other protocols are supported by that server.

Monitoring PMI data with Tivoli Performance Viewer

Recently I got opportunity to use Tivoli Performance Viewer (TPV) for monitoring application server counters of Java base web application which was deployed on Websphere Application Server. Below are the guidelines for how to use TPV to view Performance Monitoring Infrastructure (PMI) data in chart or table form.

Basic:

TPV monitors the performance activity of all servers on a node.  Before monitoring one should confirm that one or more servers have been created and are running on the node, and that PMI is enabled.
You view performance modules when your server is experiencing performance problems. For example, a common performance problem occurs when individual sessions are too large. To help view data on a session, you can view the Servlet Session Manager PMI module and monitor the SessionObjectSize counter to make sure that Session Object Size is not too large.
Performance modules are shown in the TPV current activity settings in the administrative console.

Procedure:

  • Select PMI data to view.
    1. Click Monitoring and Tuning > Performance Viewer > Current Activity > server_name > Performance Modules (PM) in the console navigation tree.
    2. Place a check mark in the check box beside the name of each performance module that you want to view.
    3. Click on View Modules. A chart or table providing the requested data is displayed on the right side of the page. Charts are displayed by default.

If you do not see all the PMI counters you expect, or a PM you are interested in is visible but cannot be selected, PMI is not enabled for that particular counter or for any counter in that PM. Go to the PMI control area of the administrative console and enable PMI for any counters you wish to view, then return to TPV and select those PMs. To view the PMI page, click on Monitoring and Tuning > Performance Monitoring Infrastructure > server_name.

Some of the important counters you should monitor are given below:

Category Counter Description
JDBC Connection Pools CreateCount The total number of connections that are created
CloseCount The total number of connections that are closed
PoolSize The size of the connection pool.
FreePoolSize The number of free connections in the pool.
WaitingThreadCount The average number of threads that are concurrently waiting for connection.
JVM Runtime HeapSize The Total memory (KiloBytes) in Java Virtual Machine Runtime
UsedMemory The amount of Used Memory (KiloBytes) in Java Virtual Machine Runtime
Thread Pools Pool Size Average number of thread in pool
Object Request Broker Average number of thread in pool
Message Listener Average number of thread in pool
WebContainer Average number of thread in pool


Each module has several counters associated with it. These counters are displayed in a table underneath the data chart or table. Selected counters are displayed in the chart or table. You can add or remove counters from the chart or table by selecting or deselecting individual counters. By default, the first three counters for each module are shown.
You can select up to 20 counters and display them in the TPV in the Current Activity mode. The data from all the PMI counters that are currently enabled in each PM for all active instances of the PM can be recorded and captured in a TPV log file. You can view the TPV log file for a particular time period multiple times, selecting different combinations of up to 20 counters each time. You have the flexibility to observe the relationships among different performance data in a server during a particular period of time.

    1. Optional: To remove a module from a chart or table, deselect the check box next to the module and click View Modules again.
    2. Optional: To view the data in a table, click View Table on the counter selection table. To toggle back to a chart, click View Graph.
    3. Optional: To view the legend for a chart, click Show Legend. To hide the legend, click Hide Legend.
  • Scale the PMI data. You can manually adjust the scale for each counter so that the graph displays meaningful comparisons of different counters.
    1. Find the counter whose scale you want to modify in the table beneath the chart.
    2. Change the value for Scale as needed.
    3. Click Update.
  • Clear values from tables and charts.
    1. Ensure that one or more modules are selected under Performance Modules in the TPV navigation tree
    2. Click Clear Buffer beneath the chart or table. The PMI data is removed from a table or chart.
  • Reset counters to zero (0).
    1. Ensure that one or more modules are selected under Performance Modules in the TPV navigation tree
    2. Click Reset to Zero beneath the chart or table. Reset to Zero sets a new baseline using the current counter readings at the instant the button is clicked. Future data points are plotted on the graph relative to their position at the time Reset to Zero is clicked.

HP Diagnostics

HP Diagnostics falls into the middle ground between Quality Assurance and Operations Performance Validation.

For developers, having Diagnostics means that tracing code doesn’t have to be added and removed. This is a big side effect of why diagnostics can improve performance.

Diagnostics is the science of pinpointing the root cause of a problem. LoadRunner is the first load testing tool to provide a set of Diagnostics modules that trace, time, and troubleshoot end-user transactions across all tiers of the system. These modules extend LoadRunner to provide a unified view of both end-user experience and application component (method, SQL) level performance. The intuitive visual interface allows the user to drill down from a problematic business process all the way to the poorly performing component. This granularity of results ensures that every load test provides development with actionable results, thus reducing the cost and time required to optimize J2EE/.NET applications.

Diagnostics for J2EE/.NET provides complete visibility into the transaction performance of J2EE/.NET- based applications. Users can drill-down from a poorly performing end user transaction and view JNDI, web, EJB, and JDBC performance. Having identified the top-time layer, users can further drill-down to the Method or SQL level and pinpoint the slow SQL query or method impacting the end-user. This granularity of results data ensures that every load test provides development with actionable results thus reducing the cost and time required to optimize J2EE/.NET applications.

Probe Profiler Tabs

Summary

  • Memory
  • Load
  • Shortest Requests

Hotspots

  • Slowest Methods
  • CPU Hotspots (Methods)
  • Slowest SQL

Metrics

  • System (Host) CPU, Memory Usage, PageInsPerSec, PageOutsPerSec, PageOutsPerSec, Disk, Network
  • JVM: Probe: HeapFree, HeapTotal, HeapUsed
  • Java Platform: Classes, GC, Threads
  • Mercury System
  • WebLogic: EJB, Execute Queues, JDBC, etc.

Threads (JVM 1.5)

All Methods

All SQL

Collections (using LWMD)

Exceptions

Server Requests

Web Services

HP SiteScope

HP SiteScope is agentless monitoring software focused on monitoring the availability and performance of distributed IT infrastructures, including servers, operating systems, network and Internet services, applications and application components.

HP SiteScope tests a web page or a series of web pages using synthetic monitoring. However, it is not limited to web applications and can be used to monitor database servers (Oracle Database, Microsoft SQL Server, etc), UNIX servers, Microsoft Windows servers and many other types of hardware and software. It can export the collected data in real time to HP LoadRunner or it can be used in standalone mode. HP SiteScope collects data using agentless data collection. Using the collected data, HP SiteScope can send automated alerts and create monitoring reports showing status over time in graphical and tabular formats.

Monitors

HP SiteScope supports more than 85 types of IT infrastructure in physical and virtual environments and can monitor servers, databases, applications, networks, web transactions, streaming technology and integration technology, as well as generic elements including files, scripts and directories. HP SiteScope monitoring supports mid-tier processes, URLs, utilization of servers and response time of the mid-tier processes. Users can set thresholds for specific characteristics and be alerted for critical or warning conditions.

Solution Templates

HP SiteScope comes with 25 solution templates for monitoring IT infrastructure elements, including Oracle, Microsoft Exchange, SAP, WebLogic, and UNIX and Linux operating systems. Solution templates are for rapidly deploying specific monitoring based on best practice methodologies.

Components

The object-oriented SiteScope components fall into six broad categories: Webpage, Scheduler, Monitor, Alert, Script Alert and Reports.

  • The Webpage feature displays the browser-based user interface.
  • The Scheduler specifies when each monitor (such as each device or server status tracking process) runs.
  • The Monitor gathers statistics for each monitored device or server.
  • The Alert module sends e-mail, pager messages and SNMP alerts when SiteScope detects a problem.
  • The Script Alert program can run a script, restart a background service or run an external program when a problem occurs.
  • The Reports code generates Web pages that contain network statistics in a graphical or tabular format.

Monitoring

Successful business management requires the ongoing monitoring of performance in order to generate data by which to judge the success or otherwise of specific strategies. Improvement in performance can only be realistically achieved when management is properly informed about current performance. To this end it is important to identify key performance indicators (KPIs) that will enable management to monitor progress.

Interview Questions

  1. What is load testing? – Load testing is to test that if the application works fine with the loads that result from large number of simultaneous users, transactions and to determine whether it can handle peak usage periods.
  2. What is Performance testing? – Timing for both read and update transactions should be gathered to determine whether system functions are being performed in an acceptable timeframe. This should be done standalone and then in a multi user environment to determine the effect of multiple transactions on the timing of a single transaction.
  3. Did u use LoadRunner? What version? – Yes. Version 9.5.
  4. Explain the Load testing process?
    Step 1: Planning the test. Here, we develop a clearly defined test plan to ensure the test scenarios we develop will accomplish load-testing objectives. Step 2: Creating Vusers. Here, we create Vuser scripts that contain tasks performed by each Vuser, tasks performed by Vusers as a whole, and tasks measured as transactions. Step 3: Creating the scenario. A scenario describes the events that occur during a testing session. It includes a list of machines, scripts, and Vusers that run during the scenario. We create scenarios using LoadRunner Controller. We can create manual scenarios as well as goal-oriented scenarios. In manual scenarios, we define the number of Vusers, the load generator machines, and percentage of Vusers to be assigned to each script. For web tests, we may create a goal-oriented scenario where we define the goal that our test has to achieve. LoadRunner automatically builds a scenario for us. Step 4: Running the scenario.
    We emulate load on the server by instructing multiple Vusers to perform tasks simultaneously. Before the testing, we set the scenario configuration and scheduling. We can run the entire scenario, Vuser groups, or individual Vusers. Step 5: Monitoring the scenario. We monitor scenario execution using the LoadRunner online runtime, transaction, system resource, Web resource, Web server resource, Web application server resource, database server resource, network delay, streaming media resource, firewall server resource, ERP server resource, and Java performance monitors. Step 6: Analyzing test results. During scenario execution, LoadRunner records the performance of the application under different loads. We use Loadrunner’s graphs and reports to analyze the application’s performance.
  5. When do you do load and performance Testing? – We perform load testing once we are done with interface (GUI) testing. Modern system architectures are large and complex. Whereas single user testing primarily on functionality and user interface of a system component, application testing focuses on performance and reliability of an entire system. For example, a typical application-testing scenario might depict 1000 users logging in simultaneously to a system. This gives rise to issues such as what is the response time of the system, does it crash, will it go with different software applications and platforms, can it hold so many hundreds and thousands of users, etc. This is when we set do load and performance testing.
  6. What are the components of LoadRunner? – The components of LoadRunner are The Virtual User Generator, Controller, and the Agent process, LoadRunner Analysis and Monitoring, LoadRunner Books Online.
  7. What Component of LoadRunner would you use to record a Script? – The Virtual User Generator (VuGen) component is used to record a script. It enables you to develop Vuser scripts for a variety of application types and communication protocols.
  8. What Component of LoadRunner would you use to play back the script in multi user mode? – The Controller component is used to playback the script in multi-user mode. This is done during a scenario run where a Vuser script is executed by a number of Vusers in a group.
  9. What is a rendezvous point? – You insert rendezvous points into Vuser scripts to emulate heavy user load on the server. Rendezvous points instruct Vusers to wait during test execution for multiple Vusers to arrive at a certain point, in order that they may simultaneously perform a task. For example, to emulate peak load on the bank server, you can insert a rendezvous point instructing 100 Vusers to deposit cash into their accounts at the same time.
  10. What is a scenario? – A scenario defines the events that occur during each testing session. For example, a scenario defines and controls the number of users to emulate, the actions to be performed, and the machines on which the virtual users run their emulations.
  11. Explain the recording mode for web Vuser script? – We use VuGen to develop a Vuser script by recording a user performing typical business processes on a client application. VuGen creates the script by recording the activity between the client and the server. For example, in web based applications, VuGen monitors the client end of the database and traces all the requests sent to, and received from, the database server. We use VuGen to: Monitor the communication between the application and the server; Generate the required function calls; and Insert the generated function calls into a Vuser script.
  12. Why do you create parameters? – Parameters are like script variables. They are used to vary input to the server and to emulate real users. Different sets of data are sent to the server each time the script is run. Better simulate the usage model for more accurate testing from the Controller; one script can emulate many different users on the system.
  13. What is correlation? Explain the difference between automatic correlation and manual correlation? – Correlation is used to obtain data which are unique for each run of the script and which are generated by nested queries. Correlation provides the value to avoid errors arising out of duplicate values and also optimizing the code (to avoid nested queries). Automatic correlation is where we set some rules for correlation. It can be application server specific. Here values are replaced by data which are created by these rules. In manual correlation, the value we want to correlate is scanned and create correlation is used to correlate.
  14. How do you find out where correlation is required? Give few examples from your projects? – Two ways: First we can scan for correlations, and see the list of values which can be correlated. From this we can pick a value to be correlated. Secondly, we can record two scripts and compare them. We can look up the difference file to see for the values which needed to be correlated.  In my project, there was a unique id developed for each customer, it was nothing but Insurance Number, it was generated automatically and it was sequential and this value was unique. I had to correlate this value, in order to avoid errors while running my script. I did using scan for correlation.
  15. Where do you set automatic correlation options? – Automatic correlation from web point of view can be set in recording options and correlation tab. Here we can enable correlation for the entire script and choose either issue online messages or offline actions, where we can define rules for that correlation. Automatic correlation for database can be done using show output window and scan for correlation and picking the correlate query tab and choose which query value we want to correlate. If we know the specific value to be correlated, we just do create correlation for the value and specify how the value to be created.
  16. What is a function to capture dynamic values in the web Vuser script? – Web_reg_save_param function saves dynamic data information to a parameter.
  17. When do you disable log in Virtual User Generator, When do you choose standard and extended logs? – Once we debug our script and verify that it is functional, we can enable logging for errors only. When we add a script to a scenario, logging is automatically disabled. Standard Log Option: When you select
    Standard log, it creates a standard log of functions and messages sent during script execution to use for debugging. Disable this option for large load testing scenarios. When you copy a script to a scenario, logging is automatically disabled Extended Log Option: Select
    extended log to create an extended log, including warnings and other messages. Disable this option for large load testing scenarios. When you copy a script to a scenario, logging is automatically disabled. We can specify which additional information should be added to the extended log using the extended log options.
  18. How do you debug a LoadRunner script? – VuGen contains two options to help debug Vuser scripts-the Run Step by Step command and breakpoints. The Debug settings in the Options dialog box allow us to determine the extent of the trace to be performed during scenario execution. The debug information is written to the Output window. We can manually set the message class within your script using the lr_set_debug_message function. This is useful if we want to receive debug information about a small section of the script only.
  19. How do you write user defined functions in LR? Give me few functions you wrote in your previous project? – Before we create the User Defined functions we need to create the external library (DLL) with the function. We add this library to VuGen bin directory. Once the library is added then we assign user defined function as a parameter. The function should have the following format: __declspec (dllexport) char* <function name>(char*, char*)Examples of user defined functions are as follows:GetVersion, GetCurrentTime, GetPltform are some of the user defined functions used in my earlier project.
  20. What are the changes you can make in run-time settings? – The Run Time Settings that we make are: a) Pacing – It has iteration count. b) Log – Under this we have Disable Logging Standard Log and c) Extended Think Time – In think time we have two options like Ignore think time and Replay think time. d) General – Under general tab we can set the Vusers as process or as multithreading and whether each step as a transaction.
  21. Where do you set Iteration for Vuser testing? – We set Iterations in the Run Time Settings of the VuGen. The navigation for this is Run time settings, Pacing tab, set number of iterations.
  22. How do you perform functional testing under load? – Functionality under load can be tested by running several Vusers concurrently. By increasing the amount of Vusers, we can determine how much load the server can sustain.
  23. What is Ramp up? How do you set this? – This option is used to gradually increase the amount of Vusers/load on the server. An initial value is set and a value to wait between intervals can be specified. To set Ramp Up, go to ‘Scenario Scheduling Options’
  24. What is the advantage of running the Vuser as thread? – VuGen provides the facility to use multithreading. This enables more Vusers to be run per generator. If the Vuser is run as a process, the same driver program is loaded into memory for each Vuser, thus taking up a large amount of memory. This limits the number of Vusers that can be run on a single
    generator. If the Vuser is run as a thread, only one instance of the driver program is loaded into memory for the given number of Vusers (say 100). Each thread shares the memory of the parent driver program, thus enabling more Vusers to be run per generator.
  25. If you want to stop the execution of your script on error, how do you do that? – The lr_abort function aborts the execution of a Vuser script. It instructs the Vuser to stop executing the Actions section, execute the vuser_end section and end the execution. This function is useful when you need to manually abort a script execution as a result of a specific error condition. When you end a script using this function, the Vuser is assigned the status “Stopped”. For this to take effect, we have to first uncheck the .Continue on error. Option in Run-Time Settings.
  26. What is the relation between Response Time and Throughput? – The Throughput graph shows the amount of data in bytes that the Vusers received from the server in a second. When we compare this with the transaction response time, we will notice that as throughput decreased, the response time also decreased. Similarly, the peak throughput and highest response time would occur approximately at the same time.
  27. Explain the Configuration of your systems? – The configuration of our systems refers to that of the client machines on which we run the Vusers. The configuration of any client machine includes its hardware settings, memory, operating system, software applications, development tools, etc. This system component configuration should match with the overall system configuration that would include the network infrastructure, the web server, the database server, and any other components that go with this larger system so as to achieve the load testing objectives.
  28. How do you identify the performance bottlenecks? – Performance Bottlenecks can be detected by using monitors. These monitors might be application server monitors, web server monitors, database server monitors and network monitors. They help in finding out the troubled area in our scenario which causes increased response time. The measurements made are usually performance response time, throughput, hits/sec, network delay graphs, etc.
  29. If web server, database and Network are all fine where could be the problem? – The problem could be in the system itself or in the application server or in the code written for the application.
  30. How did you find web server related issues? – Using Web resource monitors we can find the performance of web servers. Using these monitors we can analyze throughput on the web server, number of hits per second that
    occurred during scenario, the number of http responses per second, the number of downloaded pages per second.
  31. How did you find database related issues? – By running Database monitor and help of Data Resource Graph. We can find database related issues. E.g. you can specify the resource you want to measure on before running the controller and then you can see database related issues.
  32. Explain all the web recording options?Here you specify HTML or URL base recording.
  33. What is the difference between Overlay graph and Correlate graph?Overlay Graph: It overlay the content of two graphs that shares a common x-axis. Left Y-axis on the merged graph shows the current graph’s value & Right Y-axis show the value of Y-axis of the graph that was merged. Correlate Graph: Plot the Y-axis of two graphs against each other. The active graph’s Y-axis becomes X-axis of merged graph. Y-axis of the graph that was merged becomes merged graph’s Y-axis.
  34. How did you plan the Load? What are the Criteria? – Load test is planned to decide the number of users, what kind of machines we are going to use and from where they are run. It is based on 2 important documents, Task Distribution Diagram and Transaction profile. Task Distribution Diagram gives us the information on number of users for a particular transaction and the time of the load. The peak usage and off-usage are decided from this Diagram. Transaction profile gives us the information about the transactions name and their priority levels with regard to the scenario we are deciding.
  35. What does vuser_init action contain? – Vuser_init action contains procedures to login to a server.
  36. What does vuser_end action contain? – Vuser_end section contains log off procedures.
  37. What is think time? How do you change the threshold? –   Think time is the time that a real user waits between actions. Example: When a user receives data from a server, the user may wait several seconds to review the data before responding. This delay is known as the think time. Changing the Threshold: Threshold level is the level below which the recorded think time will be ignored. The default value is five (5) seconds. We can change the think time threshold in the Recording options of the VuGen.
  38. What is the difference between standard log and extended log? – The standard log sends a subset of functions and messages sent during script execution to a log. The subset depends on the Vuser type Extended log sends a detailed script execution messages to the output log. This is mainly used during debugging when we want information about: Parameter substitution, Data returned by the server, advanced trace.
  39. Explain the following functions:lr_debug_message – The lr_debug_message function sends a debug message to the output log when the specified message class is set. lr_output_message – The lr_output_message function sends notifications to the Controller Output window and the Vuser log file. lr_error_message – The lr_error_message function sends an error message to the LoadRunner Output window. lrd_stmt – The lrd_stmt function associates a character string (usually a SQL statement) with a cursor. This function sets a SQL statement to be processed. lrd_fetch – The lrd_fetch function fetches the next row from the result set.
  40. ThroughputIf the throughput scales upward as time progresses and the number of Vusers increase, this indicates that the bandwidth is sufficient. If the graph were to remain relatively flat as the number of Vusers increased, it would
    be reasonable to conclude that the bandwidth is constraining the volume of
    data delivered.
  41. Types of Goals in Goal-Oriented Scenario – Load Runner provides you with five different types of goals in a goal oriented scenario: 1)The number of concurrent Vusers, 2)The number of hits per second, 3)The number of transactions per second, 4)The number of pages per minute, 5)The transaction response time that you want your scenario
  42. Analysis Scenario (Bottlenecks): In Running Vuser graph correlated with the response time graph you can see that as the number of Vusers increases, the average response time of the check itinerary transaction very gradually increases. In other words, the average response time steadily increases as the load
    increases. At 56 Vusers, there is a sudden, sharp increase in the average response
    time. We say that the test broke the server. That is the mean time before failure (MTBF). The response time clearly began to degrade when there were more than 56 Vusers running simultaneously.
  43. What is correlation? Explain the difference between automatic correlation and manual correlation? – Correlation is used to obtain data which are unique for each run of the script and which are generated by nested queries. Correlation provides the value to avoid errors arising out of duplicate values and also optimizing the code (to avoid nested queries). Automatic correlation is where we set some rules for correlation. It can be application server specific. Here values are replaced by data which are created by these rules. In manual correlation, the value we want to correlate is scanned and create correlation is used to correlate.
  44. Where do you set automatic correlation options? – Automatic correlation from web point of view can be set in recording options and correlation tab. Here we can enable correlation for the entire script and choose either issue online messages or offline actions, where we can define rules for that correlation.  Automatic correlation for database can be done using show output window and scan for correlation and picking the correlate query tab and choose which query value we want to correlate. If we know the specific value to be correlated, we just do create correlation for the value and specify how the value to be created.
  45. What is a function to capture dynamic values in the web Vuser script? – Web_reg_save_param function saves dynamic data information to a parameter.